You never stop learning!

A follow up to “Ongoing Research – slowly building up the knowledge base!” – You never stop learning!

naturestimeline

You never stop learning, well I also never stop undertaking my own research or following that of others. This post is a very brief one and perhaps I should entitle it “The research continues”.

Below is a replicated screen grab of my 2400th uploaded Evernote note as uploaded into Trello. I simply thought I would share it with you.

Evernote note number 2400 uploaded onto Trello

Not much blogging of late as I’ve been otherwise engaged in my freelancing activities. However, I’m always on the search for more work so please get in touch if I can help your business out in any way. For instance, I’m currently engaged in a few bird surveying projects in Southern and Central parts of the UK but I’m always on the look out for more.

Speaking of which, let’s have some record shots of some of those young birds which might just be in your backyard at the current time.

P1000031 A…

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Earlier Birds

The earlier birds catch the worms?

Not always the wisest of choices in this “dog eat dog” world of survival of the fittest. Yet Blackbirds are known for taking risks by attempting to rear an early brood. But this early?

For more information, please follow the attached link to Chris Foster’s wonderful blog at Considering Birds.

Considering Birds

An insistent chirrup gave it away: a just-out-of-the-nest blackbird begging for food under the shelter of an evergreen oak. Its parents were both in close attendance, and if they’re capable of complex thought they were no doubt thinking smugly that their gamble had paid off. The blackbird is usually an early bird, but a fledged chick on February 10th is evidence of an astonishingly early breeding attempt, though by all reports not an isolated one this year. Somehow this pair had snuck around building a nest, feeding and raising a chick almost under our noses, deep in the low hedges that line a well-traversed footpath. I’d seen the male carrying a worm, rather than immediately swallowing it, but not put two and two together. I hadn’t heard him singing, nor seen either parent carrying nest material.

At dusk on that same day a different male blackbird was in full…

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Ongoing Research – slowly building up the knowledge base!

As of this afternoon, I have completed a first stage of many by documenting my scanned (poorly) handwritten notes for a personal research project I have in mind. An example from one of the 184 notes I have uploaded in recent days is shown below.

*be prepared for a geek moment

Doxie 0240 example - Yellow Wagtail 1

Doxie scanned example of handwritten notes – Yellow Wagtail 1

 

 

I have also tagged them within Evernote with various wordings for later referencing. For those of you who don’t know what Evernote is, it is a digital note-taking software package and is available with both offline and online versions. Below is an example screen grab of my current Evernote setup for the purposes of this Bird Research Project.

 

Evernote setup screen grab example - Yellow Wagtail 1

Evernote setup screen grab example – Yellow Wagtail 1

 

I may eventually try to find a way of incorporating this growing evidence base of notes of viable conservation measures onto Trello. Again, for those unaware of this particular Social Media tool, it is pretty much, a Project Management software package. Please follow the previously stated URLs for further information on both programs.

 

Trello Naturestimeline Birds and Birding Board screen grab example

Trello Naturestimeline Birds and Birding Board screen grab example

In addition to my aforementioned handwritten notes, I have amassed a whole host of referable sources covering numerous topics in recent months. As with anything entrepreneurial, one obstacles will probably be a lack of funds and it is also a very time-consuming process to boot. Nonetheless, as you can see, I have big plans for Naturestimeline, Naturestimeline StandUp4Nature and UKbirdingtimeline in the future. Should you be interested in finding out more, just drop me an email at info AT naturestimeline dot com. Who knows, we might be able to work together for the common good and attempt to address that most pertinent of questions “why birds matter and how to conserve them”.

 

Best Wishes

 

Tony Powell

 

 

 

naturestimeline Education services – “A conservation professional sharing his personal perspective on breaking news stories from the world of nature alongside his own accounts from the field.”

and

 

see also – https://naturestimeline.com/2016/05/13/you-never-stop-learning/

 

A Christmas Robin with a spring in its step, not least its voice! And just why might that be.

Of late, I’ve heard song from Blackbirds, Song Thrushes, Robins, Mistle Thrushes, Great Tits and Coal Tits and probably a couple more I haven’t mentioned. Why?

Perhaps this pre-Christmas Davis weather station graph might help guide you towards an answer.

 

Pre-Christmas Air Temperature Maximums - December 2015

Pre-Christmas Air Temperature Maximums from Newbury, Berkshire – December 2015 so far.

 

Yes, the unseasonable Temperatures aren’t helping our bird’s natural processes of late, least not, nature in general is pretty confused. The minimum Temperatures as illustrated by the chart below don’t help things much either. You’ll note that I am yet to register a single Air Frost in December. Once again, the blue line (in this case, maroon) represents the approximate average conditions expected in any given year.

 

Pre-Christmas Air Temperature Minimums - December 2015

Pre-Christmas Air Temperature Minimums from Newbury, Berkshire – December 2015 so far.

 

Now time for some Christmas cheer. Voted No.1 in David Lindo’s UK’s Favourite Bird survey, as promised, here is our Christmas Robin.

 

P1010617

A Robin Redbreast (Erithacus rubecula)

Happy Christmas and a Happy New Year from Tony Powell and UKbirdingtimeline.com

 

 

naturestimeline Education services – “A conservation professional sharing his personal perspective on breaking news stories from the world of nature alongside his own accounts from the field.”

and

Climate Change effects on our already vulnerable Bird species

Here is an article which recently grabbed my attention, courtesy of BirdLife International. Do have a read through it.

The Messengers: Preview our upcoming climate change report

As with most things in nature, be it climate, birds or otherwise, there is a certain amount of predictability about our knowledge of things but also other aspects remain unchartered waters, so to speak. One thing you can be sure of, is that some species are in dire need of human intervention if they are to sustain their own populations. With frequent flash flooding episodes on the rise, we know for a fact that such events will continue to decimate many vulnerable ground-nesting bird’s broods. Equally, when left unchecked, so too do the rising numbers of egg and chick-raiding predators. These are in reality additional threats over and above those mentioned within the article. I therefore believe that we at least need to mitigate against Climate Change, even if it is the only action most will be willing to take.

naturestimeline Education services – “A conservation professional sharing his personal perspective on breaking news stories from the world of nature alongside his own accounts from the field.”

and

A LinkedIn share from Tony Powell – Migrating Birds of Land and Sea. Sometimes even they, need a rest!

There are a great many Social Media platforms upon which you can be active these days. In this instance, I bring to your attention, one of my published posts as Tony Powell over at LinkedIn concerning the often perilous journeys of Bird Migration.

Migrating Birds of Land and Sea. Sometimes even they, need a rest!

Let us hope the birds made it safely to lands afar and are now stuffing their little bellies full of Autumnal fruits and seeds and whatever their beaks can take. Take care now and enjoy the spectacle, courtesy of Martin Grimm and his Clever & Smarty YouTube channel 

naturestimeline Education services – “A conservation professional sharing his personal perspective on breaking news stories from the world of nature alongside his own accounts from the field.”

and

First proper signs of Autumn in the air

Just the other day I made a concerted effort to go to a networking event which is an unusual thing for me to do but needs must, I guess. In truth, I’m not an overly social being which is quite unlike those nomadic wanderers, Redwings (Turdus iliacus) which always tend to arrive around these parts at this time of the season.

Well, to cut a long-story short, into the wee early hours of Sunday 11th October after the above-mentioned event  I heard some Redwing calling (example calls provided by xeno-canto.org) overhead for the first time this Autumn. In reality I cannot be sure how many, probably only just a couple but they’ve arrived, yippee.

You can see from the chart below that their arrival dates in my patch have been very consistent during recent years.  As this was also at approximately one o’clock in the morning I feel I did quite well to be so observant at such an hour.

First Redwing of Autumn (locally) as of 2015

First Redwing of Autumn (locally) as of 2015

Click on the chart image above in order to access the datasets in full screen.

Best Wishes and Happy Redwing hunting amongst a plethora of other Autumnal delights.

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